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 Review of The Night of the Falcon
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couldron
SS novice field agent

1438 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2006 :  19:20:23  Show Profile
This episode has the distinction of having the largest prop of the series. The interesting point about the blowing up of the town is that Gilligan’s Lagoon is once again used. This episode is hard for me because there are interesting things within the story but not the story itself. One scene Sue Kesler comments on in her book
quote:
“If you watch closely during the scene where the real Munez is killed in the explosion, West and Gordon are talking about the situation and Bob Conrad is trying very hard not to laugh, while Martin manages to keep a straight face.”

Conrad puts his tongue into his cheek in order not to laugh. What is going on in the scene is Jim is teasing Artie so it comes off as just a tease but I do wonder what was really going on. In another scene, Jim has escaped and is fighting a guard. He hits him and runs on. The guard however looks like he was expecting another hit that does not come then he falls down. The tag is one of my favorites. The look on Artie’s face when he discovers the gun is loaded is a smile maker. I have mentioned this before and am still waiting for ccd’s answered but is the Denver mint an anachronism?
http://www.wildwildwest.org/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=210&SearchTerms=denver,mint br / br /


Herr Ostropolyer
SS 1st assignment - desk job

USA
209 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2006 :  16:54:40  Show Profile
Great Review couldron,

TNOT Falcon is another of my guilty pleasures, and a much needed one in this season of down to earth plots. The share ridiculousness of the plot is very refreshing. It is so blatantly trying to rip-off the style of the 60's Batman tv series that it actually works. Like Batman, WWW has an A-list actor as the main villian ala Robert Duval, howver unlike those actors he does not over act as the Falcon, and actually hides in the background, which I will discuss later. His Dr. Humphries aka the Falcon, like the Batman villians has an infinity for falcons. He has a falcon cannon, he dresses as a falcon, his henchmen also have falcon costumes, plus he has a very beautiful and deadly moll in Lana Benson. Also like Batman, Jim produces a gadget that we never realized Jim had which was the climbing claws. (How convinient!) LOL! Lastly we even get a cave, no not the Batcave, but the Falcon Cave set is very good indeed.

I think the plot is wonderful and very comic book like in that our heroes must stop this most destructive weapon before time runs out. For those of you who scoff at the simplicity of the plot, may I suggest you watch the episode in the way that fan fiction writer Private North suggests, in that Lana Benson and not Humphries is the Falcon. There are very weird scenes where Benson alone on her horse watched on as events took place with her pet falcon on her arm. Why have that, unless of course she was the real Falcon and used Humphries as her drugest as well as target, in case the Falcon's defenses were ever penetraited. Making her one of the most mysterious villians in the entire series because our boys never find her out.

Plus, the dire fact that the Falcon had two Falcon Cannons and our boys only destroyed the one is quite intriquing and demands that this episode have a sequal, that sadly we'll never get, but that Private North satisfies in his tale.

I loved all the villians who travelled to Sinful for the negotations, they were all delightfully wicked and very belivable, but not as the Chester Gould like syndicate we got in TNOT Poisonous Posey. The Falcons guests are the heads of their syndicates, but they do not specialize in violent deaths, they are more or less the brains and not the braun of thier outfits.

RC and RM are in tip top shape this episodein the action and disguise departments, and I'll forgive Jim for using the ol' knock out the guards and where their uniform as a disguise trick. I just can't believe West never gave the little girl her toy duck back. What a cad! lol!

A great fast paced Batman style adventure that shines!
4 out of 5 stars.

Herr Ostropolyer

"You are also traveling to Sinful. How Extraaaordinary."-Artie impersonating Felice Munez going to the negotions in TNOT Falcon
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beerbad
SS novice field agent

683 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2006 :  07:03:10  Show Profile
Yeah, I like Falcon, too. Mostly for Robert Duvall. He played in some science fiction in the 60's including "Miniature" for Twilight Zone and a Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea that I have on tape.
Batman like? Yeah, somewhat, but good Batman.
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Redhead1617
SS novice field agent

USA
1393 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2006 :  12:42:59  Show Profile  Visit Redhead1617's Homepage
For some odd reason, this was one of my guilty favorites of the original 25 episodes of my collection. I always did wonder why Jim did not give the little girl back her duck at least he put it to good use, "quack." lol I did like Artie as Munez, and oh! I love it when Jim comes in to save the day "I would like you to meet MY friend, Senior" awwww Artie's pretty slick in the "auction" Always did wonder what happened to the other cannon, but never really put a lot of energy to make a follow up


1/2

~Red

*sigh...where's MY Ross Martin?
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Private North
Secret Service recruit

25 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2006 :  13:34:28  Show Profile
Without a doubt among my most favorite episodes. Though I never dealt with the second Falcon cannon in my story. Whether it was destroyed in the blast in the original episode (though not likely as West, Artemus and Lana Benson survived behind the door, one would assume the second gun would survive whereever it was. Maybe the US government found it and took it away or Humphries already had it in Europe somewhere already (there were some huge and powerful guns used in the First World War) but that is open to one's own opinions.

Herr Ostropolyer's comments in his post about Lana Benson maybe being the Falcon herself was pretty close to why I did the story as I could imagine it just by watching the episode as she acted pretty cool and calculated thoughout the episode and even managed a smile when one of the Falcon's henchmen smashed Heindorf with the "Falcon Mace". I figured she could pick up where Humphries left off (though it was with a more powerful weapon - (Atomic Bomb)- if anyone caught my "Los Alamos" comment by Colonal Richmond at the end of the story. I could see her more as the Falcon than Humphries was or as a bigger clog in the organization at the very least.

That being said I hope the DVDs come out for all the seasons as it will have all the episodes in their proper order (at present I only have around eighty of the episodes on VSH tapes in no particular order and the foreamentioned episode was almost eaten once by my VCR at the end so I don't dare watch the rest of that tape which has a second episode on it past the point where the tape was yanked out.
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ccb
SS Quizmaster Emeritus

3799 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2006 :  21:02:45  Show Profile
We'll have to get Red to explain to us why this episode is for her a "guilty" pleasure. I find it a pleasure, and I don't feel at all guilty about it!

Like "The Watery Death," this is another show that shouldn't work as well as it does. By that I mean, somebody—probably Henry Sharp, though then art-director Craig Smith drew up the actual designs (see The Kesler Bible)—thought up some weird contraption, then Mr. Lansbury assigned it to a writer (here, Bob Kent) to wrap a story around it. Actually, the story works rather well, integrating the by-now obligatory character for Mr. Gordon into the proceedings more effectively than many episodes manage. In a way, Kent's script is yet another haircut on Goldfinger (1964): the hood's congress convened to bid for shares in an outrageous plot involving a mastermind with a bomb. In both cases, few of the hoods walk away from the congress. Note also that, in both this episode and in the classic Bond movie, the captured agent lures a guard into his cell with something childish—a toy, a game—only to jump the guard from above.

Not only is the story entertaining; it's very well told by director Marvin Chomsky in his first of many outings for the series. By Season Four, Chomsky and Irving Moore had become the crew's two favorite directors. The teaser is especially suspenseful: Something awful's about to happen, but we don't know what. And then they give us a little girl crossing the street in front of a monstrous, unseen 18–wheeler …

The characters are well-drawn and well cast. Each of the four continental hoods has his own personality: charming (Muńez), no-nonsense (Heindorff), light-hearted (Marchmont), and weasely (Balya). All four are enjoyably rendered by four ace character actors (especially Joe Ruskin, who was one nasty Viper in "The Fatal Trap"). Lovely and talented Lisa Gaye ("The Skulls") returns as another femme fatale, dressed in a hot Robin-Hood outfit. Best of all is the wonderful Robert Duvall, on stardom's threshhold, playing dual roles, both convincingly.

The show finally belongs, however, to the CBS prop department's glorious falcon cannon. The thing is huge, delightfully Victorian, wonderfully visual, and beautifully lit. Given the fact that there couldn't be many CBS series of the era that could recycle into their scripts a sculpted falcon (Gunsmoke? The Lucy Show? Green Acres?), Mr. Lansbury heroically persuaded the studio to spend some serious money to fabricate the thing, then hire good actors to tap-dance around it. A week's work well done. Indeed, my major complaint of the episode is that the cannon wasn't given more than a few minutes of screen-time. I wanted to enjoy it longer, from different and interesting angles!



P.S.: Often I've slowed down my tape to watch the teaser's town before it goes boom, but can never make out the drained-lagoon from Gilligan's Island.

P..P.S.: After watching this show for forty years, there is one brief scene that I still don't get. In fact, I can hardly even make it out. It's in Act I, when West appears to be scooped up by two villainous horsemen. Is that supposed to West between them, as the horsemen recede from the camera? And if so, why is West perfectly free, the next time we see him?
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lleroy
SS 1st assignment - desk job

USA
261 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2006 :  21:28:08  Show Profile
P..P.S.: After watching this show for forty years, there is one brief scene that I still don't get. In fact, I can hardly even make it out. It's in Act I, when West appears to be scooped up by two villainous horsemen. Is that supposed to West between them, as the horsemen recede from the camera? And if so, why is West perfectly free, the next time we see him?

I haven't watched this one in a while, so I could be remembering it wrong, but I think that, even though it looks as though the horsemen have captured West, they've really picked up their fallen comrade.

Leslie
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Private North
Secret Service recruit

25 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2006 :  19:16:41  Show Profile
It is interesting that part was brought up. I also thought that it was West that the two horsemen had captured between them. And the very next scene he was free but never thought to much of it believing that was some of the footage cut from the original episode. In the 60s the length of the episodes was 52 minutes I believe and than they had to cut out four minutes to make more room for an additional bunch of commercials. Hopefully the DVDs will be full length with the missing scenes included. Anyway back to the scene (I just checked my tape and watched real closely that scene). Where West turns and runs away from the two appoaching horsemen the very next scene one sees the two horsemen carrying between them someone who I always took as West but looking closely one can definitely make out a cape on the body similar to the capes the two riders have on. So it definitely was in fact the first horseman that West had shot just before.
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Sassy2
SS novice field agent

USA
1001 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2006 :  10:01:36  Show Profile
Something I like to do with some of my WWWest favourite eps is is to ask whether someone did any research to provide plausible numbers in the story. After all, script editor Henry Sharp was a mechanical engineer, so one might assume he ran some numbers before filming.

So let's do it -- let's ask ourselves, in TNot Falcon, IS THE CANNON PLAUSIBLE? OR EVEN POSSIBLE?

Well, I did this analysis way back in '97... 1997, that is. But like our favourite show, it's an oldie but a goodie. Turning on the Way-back machine...


The Falcon's Cannon
~~~ ~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~

Jim and Artie did us a favour in act two. Artemus figures out that the
3 towns the Falcon has already leveled - Salidas, Rome Plateau, and Tonga Flats, lie roughly on a curve with Sinful, CO in the center. He even shows Jim - and us - on a map, identifying the three targets as being in the SW, S, and SE portion of the state, with Sinful a bit north, above the middle town.

So I've got my handy-dandy map of Colorado here. The state is nearly square, with a length of 375 km and a width of 275 km. Denver is 150 km in from the east and 100 km in from the north. That puts the mythical Sinful, CO between 75 km and 125 km somwhere south of Denver. Of course, Sinful is a name made up for the show, but funny enough, as I look on the map, in almost the perfect location, there is a *real* city called "Canon City". Okay, so I'll take Sinful to be Canon City, located 100 km (60 miles) S of Denver.

So how much force does Falcon's cannon have to exert on a projectile to launch it from Canon City to Denver, if he's going to uphold his threat to our heroes?

(We aren't even going to look at what type of projectile or what type of propulsion is used for now.)


Time to do a bit of science!

We know that the angle at which the projectile was to be launched was 72 degrees to the horizontal [Falcon told us], and it needs to travel 100 km or 100,000 meters.

Let the initial speed of the projectile, at an angle of 72 degrees = V. Projectile physics has been known for centuries, and simply requires some trigonometry. Trig says that along the ground component, the initial speed of the projectile is V(cos 72 deg) = .3V, and straight upwards is V (sin 72 deg) = .95V .

There is this thing, called The Range Equation, that folks usually just look up to determine how fast something has to be launched to reach a certain distance, if the angle at which it is launched is known.

RANGE = V(cos 72 deg) x [-4V(sin 72 deg) / g]

where g = the acceleration
of gravity on Earth = -9.8m/s^2

So RANGE = 100,000 m = [.3V x .4V]s^2/m - the units work out, thank goodness.

and V = [sqrt[100,000]/(.3x.4) ]m/s = 2635 meters per second
= 2.6 km per sec

(Well, at least this is less than the earth's escape velocity, which
is 11.2 km/s)

In units more familiar, the velocity at which the Falcon's projectile is launched, V = 5760 miles per hour... *smokin'!*

This means that if one of our heroes got loose just in time to warn Denver, they'd have 2.1 minutes from launch to send a telegraph and all the citizens to get out of town. I don't think so....


Okay, so it's big. Muzzle velocities of handguns are on the order of hundreds of miles per hour, a factor of 10 lower. Doesn't seem ridiculous to me, but then I have no idea of the average cannon muzzle velocity. Anyone know?


What I find inpossible is the maximum altitude achieved by the shell.
Using kinematics again, we get the max height achieved = 177,725 m
= 10 miles, roughly. The equations I used consider the acceleration of gravity to be a constant, and at these astounding heights, that no longer holds. Falcon is practically putting his shell into orbit!



It may be interesting thing is what happens when you accelerate the projectile down the cannon barrel to launch it with that speed.

The length of the barrel looks to be approx. 2 meters on screen. The projectile starts at rest and reaches 2635 m/s at the end of the barrel. Assuming uniform acceleration, the time it takes to traverse the barrel is roughly .0007 seconds and the average acceleration along the barrel looks like 3.8 x 10^6 m/s^2, or 384000 "G"s. You've heard that before. They always talk about how much G-force someone pulls while flying a plane or spacecraft, or even in a car accident, where "G"s can go up into the 100s. Humans lose consciousness typically around 7Gs (prolonged exposure) without conditioning. I don't know that plain iron is going to hold together under the sort of impulse we're talking about here, either.

You probably don't want to play human cannonball with Falcon's gun, as Loveless did in that awful episode with the evil Jeremy Pike.


I'd do more, but we haven't a clue what kind of projectile the Falcon gun fires. If we believe Jim and Artie, and I guess we should, it's actually some form of shell. But what size??? Could weight anything from a few pounds to a few thousand pounds. And what is he using for combustion?


Sigh. Such unanswered questions....



"Time has little to do with infinity and jelly doughnuts."
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couldron
SS novice field agent

1438 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2006 :  13:36:35  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by sassy2

Something I like to do with some of my WWWest favourite eps is is to ask whether someone did any research to provide plausible numbers in the story. After all, script editor Henry Sharp was a mechanical engineer, so one might assume he ran some numbers before filming.

So let's do it -- let's ask ourselves, in TNot Falcon, IS THE CANNON PLAUSIBLE? OR EVEN POSSIBLE?

Well, I did this analysis way back in '97... 1997, that is. But like our favourite show, it's an oldie but a goodie. Turning on the Way-back machine...


The Falcon's Cannon
~~~ ~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~

Jim and Artie did us a favour in act two. Artemus figures out that the
3 towns the Falcon has already leveled - Salidas, Rome Plateau, and Tonga Flats, lie roughly on a curve with Sinful, CO in the center. He even shows Jim - and us - on a map, identifying the three targets as being in the SW, S, and SE portion of the state, with Sinful a bit north, above the middle town.

So I've got my handy-dandy map of Colorado here. The state is nearly square, with a length of 375 km and a width of 275 km. Denver is 150 km in from the east and 100 km in from the north. That puts the mythical Sinful, CO between 75 km and 125 km somwhere south of Denver. Of course, Sinful is a name made up for the show, but funny enough, as I look on the map, in almost the perfect location, there is a *real* city called "Canon City". Okay, so I'll take Sinful to be Canon City, located 100 km (60 miles) S of Denver.

So how much force does Falcon's cannon have to exert on a projectile to launch it from Canon City to Denver, if he's going to uphold his threat to our heroes?

(We aren't even going to look at what type of projectile or what type of propulsion is used for now.)


Time to do a bit of science!

We know that the angle at which the projectile was to be launched was 72 degrees to the horizontal [Falcon told us], and it needs to travel 100 km or 100,000 meters.

Let the initial speed of the projectile, at an angle of 72 degrees = V. Projectile physics has been known for centuries, and simply requires some trigonometry. Trig says that along the ground component, the initial speed of the projectile is V(cos 72 deg) = .3V, and straight upwards is V (sin 72 deg) = .95V .

There is this thing, called The Range Equation, that folks usually just look up to determine how fast something has to be launched to reach a certain distance, if the angle at which it is launched is known.

RANGE = V(cos 72 deg) x [-4V(sin 72 deg) / g]

where g = the acceleration
of gravity on Earth = -9.8m/s^2

So RANGE = 100,000 m = [.3V x .4V]s^2/m - the units work out, thank goodness.

and V = [sqrt[100,000]/(.3x.4) ]m/s = 2635 meters per second
= 2.6 km per sec

(Well, at least this is less than the earth's escape velocity, which
is 11.2 km/s)

In units more familiar, the velocity at which the Falcon's projectile is launched, V = 5760 miles per hour... *smokin'!*

This means that if one of our heroes got loose just in time to warn Denver, they'd have 2.1 minutes from launch to send a telegraph and all the citizens to get out of town. I don't think so....


Okay, so it's big. Muzzle velocities of handguns are on the order of hundreds of miles per hour, a factor of 10 lower. Doesn't seem ridiculous to me, but then I have no idea of the average cannon muzzle velocity. Anyone know?


What I find inpossible is the maximum altitude achieved by the shell.
Using kinematics again, we get the max height achieved = 177,725 m
= 10 miles, roughly. The equations I used consider the acceleration of gravity to be a constant, and at these astounding heights, that no longer holds. Falcon is practically putting his shell into orbit!



It may be interesting thing is what happens when you accelerate the projectile down the cannon barrel to launch it with that speed.

The length of the barrel looks to be approx. 2 meters on screen. The projectile starts at rest and reaches 2635 m/s at the end of the barrel. Assuming uniform acceleration, the time it takes to traverse the barrel is roughly .0007 seconds and the average acceleration along the barrel looks like 3.8 x 10^6 m/s^2, or 384000 "G"s. You've heard that before. They always talk about how much G-force someone pulls while flying a plane or spacecraft, or even in a car accident, where "G"s can go up into the 100s. Humans lose consciousness typically around 7Gs (prolonged exposure) without conditioning. I don't know that plain iron is going to hold together under the sort of impulse we're talking about here, either.

You probably don't want to play human cannonball with Falcon's gun, as Loveless did in that awful episode with the evil Jeremy Pike.


I'd do more, but we haven't a clue what kind of projectile the Falcon gun fires. If we believe Jim and Artie, and I guess we should, it's actually some form of shell. But what size??? Could weight anything from a few pounds to a few thousand pounds. And what is he using for combustion?


Sigh. Such unanswered questions....



"Time has little to do with infinity and jelly doughnuts."




WOWOh my Sassy, my head is spinning

Canon City lies at the beginning of Big Horn Sheep Canon. The city in the 1890's voted for a prison over a college because they thought it was a more stable income. The Federal Prison is also located near here in Florence(about 12 miles east of Canon) there is somewhere between 8 and 12 prisons in the area. The Royal Gorge just west was cut out by the Arkansas River which is great rafting. Near the Royal Gorge is the tourist attraction of Buckskin Joes which has gathered homestead from all over the state and has gun fight shows during the summer. It has been the setting of some movies and tv show.

Just in case you haven't figures it out I live in Colorado. Canon is the county seat for us. We live up the canon an hours drive. Since I am on the subject the artist Christo want to hang curtains across the Big Horn Sheep Canon. It is very controversial.
http://www.christojeanneclaude.net/otr.html
http://www.christojeanneclaude.net/otr2.html
Tell me Sassy would the calculations change any for the mountains that lie in between Cannon City and Denver?http://www.canoncity.org/

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Redhead1617
SS novice field agent

USA
1393 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2006 :  15:35:06  Show Profile  Visit Redhead1617's Homepage
lol, sounds like a Mythbusters episode they like to blow things up, why don't we ask them to do this one

~Red

*sigh...where's MY Ross Martin?
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Sassy2
SS novice field agent

USA
1001 Posts

Posted - 02/15/2006 :  11:16:37  Show Profile
quote:

Tell me Sassy would the calculations change any for the mountains that lie in between Cannon City and Denver?http://www.canoncity.org/





YES.

The maximum height of the shells from Falcon's cannon is around 10 miles, but the path is parabolic. Corrections to the angle of launch would have to be made depending upon how high those are and where exactly they're located relative to the projected path of the shell...

Again, just geometry plus (height h = ho + .95Vt + .5gt^2) and (distance d = .3Vt) with ho, V, and g already known/calculated/assumed. A good topo map plus a little math -- (plug in d for the closest mountain, solve for t, plug t in the first eqn and figure out what height the projectile would be at... does it clear the mountain?) -- would tell you what you need to know. (Hell, just plot the parabola and a profile of the mountains on a couple of 2-d maps and look for any intersections.)

If I get some time, I'll go over to the USGS web site or Terraserver-usa and download a topo map of the area. I mean, hell - I've gone this far. I might as well figure out if 72 degrees is reasonable.

Cutest thing is the fact that CANON CITY is a real place. Wrong "cannon", but who wants to be picky?



(BTW - Beautiful place, Canon City, if their web site is any indication...)



"Time has little to do with infinity and jelly doughnuts."
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K Mills
SS novice field agent

849 Posts

Posted - 02/15/2006 :  12:42:16  Show Profile
Despite some sloppy editing in the horsey scene, and Artemus insistence on clapping all the time, I like this episode a lot. Three smileyes -
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ccb
SS Quizmaster Emeritus

3799 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2006 :  18:15:02  Show Profile
sassy2: If I get some time, I'll go over to the USGS web site or Terraserver-usa and download a topo map of the area. I mean, hell - I've gone this far. I might as well figure out if 72 degrees is reasonable.

Yes, download that map. Yes, work those figures. Good Godfrey: This website is administered by a freakin' genius!

Cutest thing is the fact that CANON CITY is a real place. Wrong "cannon", but who wants to be picky?

No, the cutest thing is the offhandled way you refer to "simple geometry" and "simple trig" and run all these differential equations that I could not, could not, could not solve if my dear life depended on it.

How I love a brainy woman. Were I not happily married to another beautiful and intelligent lady for, lo, almost thirty years, I would be tempted to propose matrimony.
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Sassy2
SS novice field agent

USA
1001 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  08:46:15  Show Profile
ccb, you flirt! Now I am really going to have to do it, dangit. Okay, it's on my list of things...

Ms. Mills' comment about Artemus clapping brings to mind something about Artie's disguises in the series.... maybe this is a new thread. So I will take it to one. Hang on...





"Time has little to do with infinity and jelly doughnuts."
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Sassy2
SS novice field agent

USA
1001 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2006 :  10:38:29  Show Profile
Upon investigation, it looks like I would have to spend some money to get all the information I need to carefully determine a projectile trajectory from Canon City to Denver. (large number of topo maps needed.) But from what I can access for free online, it *looks* like the highest peak between the two cities is running around 10000 ft. Because the height needed to achieve the range is so great, the height of the mountains in between probably won't be an issue.

Of course, I'm trying to do this the hard way. The military have nice little algorithms that crank these numbers out in the blink of an eye, including the coriolis and drag force corrections. Does anyone have access to such a time saver?

(Well, even if someone did, they probably couldn't say anything about it, so I'll shut up about this somewhat self-indulgent diversion into AR-ness now.)



"Time has little to do with infinity and jelly doughnuts."
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ccb
SS Quizmaster Emeritus

3799 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2006 :  15:21:22  Show Profile
sassy2: … including the coriolis and drag force corrections.

This sounds like what some of us geezers are now suffering in deep middle–age.
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Sassy2
SS novice field agent

USA
1001 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2006 :  09:57:03  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by ccb

sassy2: … including the coriolis and drag force corrections.

This sounds like what some of us geezers are now suffering in deep middle–age.



Boy, you said it!

For an excellent analysis of some of these complex forces in action, may I suggest a little light reading you might enjoy...

"A Stress Analysis of a Strapless Evening Gown": http://www.textfiles.com/humor/gown.txt





"Time has little to do with infinity and jelly doughnuts."
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ccb
SS Quizmaster Emeritus

3799 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2006 :  15:44:38  Show Profile
I want you all to know that I read this with keen scientific interest, duly appreciative of how professionals address "the danger point."

I searched for the Figures (1, 2, et al) to which the researcher kept referring, to no avail. Nevertheless, I want to thank those heretofore unsung heroes, the world's strapless evening–dress designers, for giving us all Better Living through Physics.
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Redhead1617
SS novice field agent

USA
1393 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2006 :  18:03:43  Show Profile  Visit Redhead1617's Homepage
quote:
"A Stress Analysis of a Strapless Evening Gown": http://www.textfiles.com/humor/gown.txt


*laughing so hard tears are forming* I love physics

~Red

*sigh...where's MY Ross Martin?
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