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couldron
SS novice field agent

1438 Posts

Posted - 02/06/2007 :  22:06:44  Show Profile

SordoTheBandit

Too little Phoebe Doran....
Too much Pat Paulsen.... (Once is too many)

To me, Paulsen was like horseradish smeared on a wedding cake instead of frosting.

MaudeB
TOO MUCH PAT PAULSEN!!!

That is not possible, my friend. He and the Smothers Brothers are the absolute funniest comedians that ever lived!! "Pumas in the cravasses!" Come on!

Wow! Such passion. I have a hard time watching it since my passion lies with Sordo. I do not like Pat Paulson. He doesn’t help that he doesn’t’ plays a likeable character. It is no wonder that Jim exclaim “Yours a secret service agent? You got to be kidding.” An agent that doesn’t know enough not to yell another agents name out and an agent that tries to help a fellow agent by dropping a box on him. The poker chip was used in Thousand Eyes wasn’t it? The attempt at humor, when the buyer was thrown from the stagecoach was either lame or not executed well. I am not sure which it is. I thought the exchange of the poker chip for the book was well executed but why did they attack Pike when he left the room. I guess they just wanted a fight scene that was good especially the music.
This is not an episode I like to watch, in fact, it is down right hard for me to do so. It does have some moments so I rate it.

Mary

MaudeB
SS novice field agent

582 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2007 :  07:51:55  Show Profile

If your only exposure to Pat Paulsen is this episode of WWW, I can see why he is not highly rated. But I loved the man. He's the one who said that in Hawaii, you could see the beautiful wahinies on the beach. You know what a wahini is - that's what you put on a ba-hun with lots of ma-hustard!

(Sorry, but that just cracks me up still!)

Also he came to my college when he was running for president - funny, funny guy. Great political satire and bad jokes.
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couldron
SS novice field agent

1438 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2007 :  08:14:47  Show Profile
No this episode was not my only exposure. It is actually the previous exposure that turned me off on him. My mother used the expression everyone to their own taste said the women as she kissed her cow or it wouldn't be much of a horse race if everyone thought the same.

I don't know why the function to fix a post does not work for me. I tried to amend my comments. I wanted to add that this is a story in which we are dropped into the middle. A nice plot device the problem is we are also dropped into a relationship between Jim and Jerry without nary a mention of Artie.

Mary
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MaudeB
SS novice field agent

582 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2007 :  09:29:28  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by couldron

No this episode was not my only exposure. It is actually the previous exposure that turned me off on him. My mother used the expression everyone to their own taste said the women as she kissed her cow or it wouldn't be much of a horse race if everyone thought the same.

I don't know why the function to fix a post does not work for me. I tried to amend my comments. I wanted to add that this is a story in which we are dropped into the middle. A nice plot device the problem is we are also dropped into a relationship between Jim and Jerry without nary a mention of Artie.

You are absolutely right, this is America and even if I know I'm right and you're wrong, I will defend to the death your right of free speech.


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Herr Ostropolyer
SS 1st assignment - desk job

USA
209 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2007 :  14:32:32  Show Profile
Hey All,

Excellent Reviews as always. TNOT Camera is a guilty pleasure for me because it was one of the first that I taped recorded when TNT was airing the series in late 1990. I was disappointed that there was no Artie, but I really enjoyed Pat Paulsen's Bosley Cranston. I imagined that the writers were allowing Cranston to be the audience. In other words, We would be Cranston. True, we would not be as bumbling as Cranston or have a photographic memory, but I can easily imagine myself ruining one of Jim's missions by saying "Hey Mister West.", or accidentally killing a bad guy who was trying to harm our hero just because of the shear enjoyment of meeting one of my heroes.

After watching this episode repetatively, I understood why Cranston was so bumbling. His unpredictability and natural clumsiness added to the tension of the episode. I felt that WWW was allowing us two luxuries. The first was that they were actually doing "Mission Impossible" in the old west. Cranston(Paulsen) was the guest agent who had a particular talent (photgraphic memory) that would help West and Pike complete their mission. Also, We are given another look into the inner workings of the Secret Service through Cranston again. New field agents are given expertise by helping Agents already in the field. We get a brief glimpse of this back in the first season's TNOT Freebooters when a young agent helping West's cover is posting wanted posters with West's face on them. The Agent asks West if he can help, but West says that he is helping by putting up the wanted posters. I found this very interesting that there would be agents in training, but the series never really ventured into this area until Artie's abscence.

I felt though that West was pretty cruel here by forcing Cranston to do their paperwork, but the big payoff is when Cranston prooves himself not only in memorizing the 2nd book, but also being an expert at judo! West and Pike learn the vital lesson that one should never judge a book by it's cover especially when Cranston leaves with TLYTs instead of our star agents.

I must also agree with couldron that they did rehash details from other episodes like the poker chip from TNO A Thousand Eyes, but with a spin in which it was split in half and for both pieces to allow the Asian end of the opium ring to meet the American/English half. I felt that the fights were necessary and not over padded. Even the little twist that the Texas librarian is not the key to the opium ring is believable. I felt that the Opium Ring would not have paid a ridiculous amount of money for the book, and would simply steal/kill from the highest bidder. The entire scene with West and Cranston trying to memorize the second book while Pike distracts Stix is truly suspensful. I also feel that Pike's over the top behavior as the English Gambler is not him trying to out do RM, but is necessary because he is trying to distract Stix and his gang by amy means possible. Kudos to everyone involved: RC, Aidman, Paulsen, and Atwater are excellent!

All in all, I really enjoyed this Artieless episode because there was originality and there was so much going on: WWW doing "Mission Impossible", seeing the inner working of the Secret Service through the guest agent, the auction flim flam, the opium ring mystery, the suspensful mission, and some humor from Pat Paulsen that it proved to be an exciting hour of our show!

3 out of a possible 5 Stars!

Here Ostropolyer

"You're a secret agent, you gotta be kidding?" -James West to Bosley Cranston in TNOT Camera
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SordoTheBandit
SS 1st assignment - desk job

483 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2007 :  16:22:48  Show Profile
quote:

"To me, Paulsen was like horseradish smeared on a wedding cake instead of frosting."


This was my own quote. In retrospect, it was probably a bit harsh. I apologize to MaudeB if I sounded over the edge. I hope nothing was taken personally. I sincerely respect everyone's opinion on this board. This still doesn't change my opinion of this particular episode however, as I give it one star.

1 STAR
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MaudeB
SS novice field agent

582 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  07:05:17  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by SordoTheBandit

quote:

"To me, Paulsen was like horseradish smeared on a wedding cake instead of frosting."


This was my own quote. In retrospect, it was probably a bit harsh. I apologize to MaudeB if I sounded over the edge. I hope nothing was taken personally. I sincerely respect everyone's opinion on this board. This still doesn't change my opinion of this particular episode however, as I give it one star.

1 STAR



No offense taken, my friend. I love the discussions and debates. We are a passionate bunch.
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soulburst
SS spy school graduate

60 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  11:15:26  Show Profile

Herr O

I was Karate.
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ccb
SS Quizmaster Emeritus

3799 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  20:28:34  Show Profile
First, the title: couldron usually covers our series' Unintentional Anachronism beat. Was the term "camera" used in the early 1870s to describe the photographic instrument?

We return you now to our regularly scheduled programme.

There are some firsts associated with this episode. Obviously it was the first broadcast, though not produced, with Charles Aidman as Jeremy Pike. If you listen carefully to its music, however, you notice something else: It was the first of several episodes in Season Four that reached back into previous seasons' soundtracks. If you love West's best music as much as I do, this was good news. Most of the Oriental cues (the fight at the Chinese casino and Cranston's thrashing of Styx; the bumper at the end of Act 1) were drawn from Jack Pleis's score for "The Night of the Samurai" (1967). The last cue is also from Pleis, originally used to end "The Circus of Death." The bumper at the end of Act III—originally scored by Richard Markowtiz for "The Jack O'Diamonds"—was the most frequently used bumper cue in Season Three. And right before the Act I titles—when West leads Cranston away and the Chinese searches the corpse for the poker–chip—there is marvelous cue by Harry Geller from "The Dragon Screamed," which we hadn't heard since early 1966. For these little treasures, and more to come, I suppose we have to thank Martin Klein, the newly credited music editor. As always, when the music came from stock, the credited "music supervisor" was CBS West Coast music executive Mort Stevens.

My last "first": This was the first episode of the series I ever taped on my shiny new Tobishiba cassette recorder. When the episode was repeated, I captured the sound through a terribly fuzzy UHF transmission through my brother's spanking new RCA portable TV. My middle-class family enjoyed all the high-tech toys of the day!

Oh, the episode. What about it? It's a curiosity. It's mostly a comedy, and even with Ross Martin West typically didn't handle those especially well. (Think "The Infernal Machine.") And it guest-starred, in what was probably his first and last "dramatic" role, the now infamous stand-up comedian Pat Paulsen.

Here's the deal, folks: Pat Paulsen is a Boomer relic. If you weren't around in the 60s, he's as dated as a Pontiac GTO, if not nearly as classy. His breakthrough was in The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, where he delivered wry political commentary in a poker-faced, hang-dog manner reminiscent of Buster Keaton without the pratfalls. Like West, the Smothers' Comedy Hour was another political casualty, sacrificed to Washington as too controversial by the conservative Republican suits at CBS. Paulsen's guest-star turn on West was a casting stunt that makes sense only in that era. At the time it probably seemed to the producers a clever idea, intended to distract viewers from their first experience of the show without Ross Martin. Forty years later the distraction wears thin. For those around at the time, it dates the show almost as badly as if West had started referring to President Johnson and the Viet Nam war. For younger folks, Paulsen, a nine-days wonder, doesn't register at all and simply annoys.

There are little things in this episode that I like. I've already mentioned the "vintage" music cues. Jimmy George's wonderful crash through the mortuary window is a deliightful surprise. The business about the half-poker chip, which leads you to one of a two-volume first edition that contains half of an opium racket's delivery code, is hogwash but fun. The infiltration of Styx's library and the last-minute, jury-rigged "photographing" of the book by a blind nincompoop, while a high-stakes game is in progress in the billiard room, is not classic West but, then, neither is it all those Indians and cactus and Third Season traildust.

I remember as a kid not being confused by Ross Martin's absence. That summer I read in our local paper a wire-service entertainment report that the actor had suffered a "mild heart attack" and would be temporarily replaced by Charles Aidman. I was confused by all the characters Aidman played in this episode. I wasn't so familiar with the actor; I certainly didn't know Jeremy Pike. I scarcely got a look at his real face before the make-up artists went to work disguising it. Without his distinctive tenor to orient me at first, and understanding the way the show worked, I might have been lost altogether.

All the hubbub around finding a use for an incompetent before he blows the operation outright reminds me of early episodes of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. You may recall that its original premise, borrowing from Hitchcock (North by Northwest), was to place everyday people alongside secret agents in bizarre circumstances.

"The Camera" is a mildly amusing piece of fluff. Nothing here to extol or get your knickers in a twist over.
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MaudeB
SS novice field agent

582 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2007 :  07:04:11  Show Profile
"For younger folks, Paulsen, a nine-days wonder, doesn't register at all and simply annoys."

Talk about annoying.
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couldron
SS novice field agent

1438 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2007 :  09:36:00  Show Profile
quote:
First, the title: couldron usually covers our series' Unintentional Anachronism beat. Was the term "camera" used in the early 1870s to describe the photographic instrument?


It isn't that I missed it. I dismissed it because I knew photography existed at that time. The entomology of camera comes from the Latin word chamber, meaning room. According to Wikipedia, The name is derived from camera obscura, Latin for "dark chamber", an early mechanism for projecting images, in which an entire room functioned much as a real-time imaging system.
http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blphotography.htm
quote:
The camera obscura was the direct forerunner of the camera. The first casual reference [to the Camera Obscura] is by Aristotle (Problems, ca 330 BC), who questions how the sun can make a circular image when it shines through a square hole. Johannes Kepler was the first person to coin the phrase Camera Obscura in 1604, and in 1609, Kepler further suggested the use of a lens to improve the image projected by a Camera Obscura.
At one time, the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Spring had a camera obscura.It was a lot of fun to see. It is gone now and I am not sure where it went.
I got curious and this is what I found
Colorado Springs (USA)
This camera obscura was built in 1951 by Floyd Jennings (who also built the camera obscura in San Francisco) at High Point House in the 'Garden of the Gods' in the Pikes Peak Region. It ceased to operate in 1992 for financial reasons (the entrance fee was only 35 cents!), the building itself was demolished in 1994 and the optics are in store. The single bi-convex lens is 13" in diameter with a focal length of 13 feet. The screen was a 5ft diameter table. The optics panned round 360 degrees stopping at various points for a recorded commentary.
(Sources : Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph 31st July 1955 & 18th September 1992 / 'Man in the Garden of the Gods' R. & M.A. Gehling & 'Garden of the Gods' leaflet all kindly supplied by the Pikes Peak Library District, Colorado Springs).



Mary
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Cindylover1969
SS novice field agent

United Kingdom
1269 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2007 :  11:04:30  Show Profile  Visit Cindylover1969's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by ccb

If you listen carefully to its music, however, you notice something else: It was the first of several episodes in Season Four that reached back into previous seasons' soundtracks.



They did do that a lot in S4 (and from other CBS shows - I know they always did that, but it still startled me to hear a bumper from Hawaii Five-O turn up at the end of Act II of "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2"!).

"Make them both as uncomfortable as possible." - Marquis de la Mer, "The Night of the Watery Death"
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ccb
SS Quizmaster Emeritus

3799 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2007 :  11:24:02  Show Profile
Cindylover1969: . . . it still startled me to hear a bumper from Hawaii Five-O turn up at the end of Act II of "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2"!).

Not only that: At the end of that episode's third act, there's yet another Hawaii Five-O bumper. The last reel chase-and-fight music for that episode also was originally scored for Five-O, then recycled again for the teaser of "The Night of the Cossacks."
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